Universal School of Martial Arts Clarity Thru Movement
The system we teach is a composite system (which many people now call MMA). It is first and foremost a system of self defense. Our roots are in Japanese Karate (Shotokan and Shorin-ryu), but it also has strong influences from Judo, Aikido, Kung Fu, Muay Thai, and Jiu-Jitsu. Each of the elements is treated as important and is emphasized more or less according to the natural skill sets of the students. Our goal is to train individuals to have all the skills (physical, mental, social, and strategic) needed to come home safely, day in and day out. Competition in and of itself is not one of our training goals, and it is not necessary for progression in our system. With that being said, some students often wish to try the competitive side of the Martial Arts (and many have done so with great success), and when they do, we always work towards adding those elements of rules and regulations to help them along. Below you will find an individual description of each of the arts from which our system is derived. Karate Karate is a striking art using punching, kicking, knee strikes, elbow strikes, and various open-handed strikes, grappling, locks, restraints, throws, and vital point strikes. It is believed to have been developed in the late 1300s/ early 1400s in Okinawa from Chinese martial arts that were taught to the Okinawans by Chinese that had immigrated to the island. Judo Judo is considered a modern martial art, and a combative sport created in Japan in 1882 by Dr Kano Jigoro. The most prominent features of chokes, and control techniques against opponents to immobilize or subdue opponents once they have taken them to the ground. Jiu Jitsu Jiu Jitsu (or jujutsu) is Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an armed and armored opponents. Practitioners learn efficient methods for neutralizing opponents through the use of pins, joint locks, and throws. These techniques were developed around the principle of using an attacker's energy against him, rather than directly opposing it. Many variations to this system have developed through the centuries including Gracie jiu jitsu and Aikido (both of which are practiced in our system. Aikido Aikido is a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a synthesis of his martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Aikido derives mainly from the martial art of Daito-ryu Aiki-jujutsu, but Ueshiba began to diverge from it in the late 1920s. Aikido uses the movements of the attacker and redirects the force of the attack rather than opposing it head-on. This requires very little physical strength, instead the attacker's momentum and force are used against them through entering and turning movements. The techniques are completed with various throws and/ or joint locks. Muay Thai Muay Thai is a martial art from Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques. Muay Thai is referred to as the "Art of Eight Limbs" or the "Science Of Eight Limbs" because it makes use of punches, kicks, elbows and knee strikes, thus using eight "points of contact".

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1446 Campbell Rd . Houston . TX . 77055

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The system we teach is a composite system (which many people now call MMA). It is first and foremost a system of self defense. Our roots are in Japanese Karate (Shotokan and Shorin-ryu), but it also has strong influences from Judo, Aikido, Kung Fu, Muay Thai, and Jiu-Jitsu. Each of the elements is treated as important and is emphasized more or less according to the natural skill sets of the students. Our goal is to train individuals to have all the skills (physical, mental, social, and strategic) needed to come home safely, day in and day out. Competition in and of itself is not one of our training goals, and it is not necessary for progression in our system. With that being said, some students often wish to try the competitive side of the Martial Arts (and many have done so with great success), and when they do, we always work towards adding those elements of rules and regulations to help them along. Below you will find an individual description of each of the arts from which our system is derived. Karate Karate is a striking art using punching, kicking, knee strikes, elbow strikes, and various open-handed strikes, grappling, locks, restraints, throws, and vital point strikes. It is believed to have been developed in the late 1300s/ early 1400s in Okinawa from Chinese martial arts that were taught to the Okinawans by Chinese that had immigrated to the island. Judo Judo is considered a modern martial art, and a combative sport created in Japan in 1882 by Dr Kano Jigoro. The most prominent features of chokes, and control techniques against opponents to immobilize or subdue opponents once they have taken them to the ground. Jiu Jitsu Jiu Jitsu (or jujutsu) is Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an armed and armored opponents. Practitioners learn efficient methods for neutralizing opponents through the use of pins, joint locks, and throws. These techniques were developed around the principle of using an attacker's energy against him, rather than directly opposing it. Many variations to this system have developed through the centuries including Gracie jiu jitsu and Aikido (both of which are practiced in our system. Aikido Aikido is a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a synthesis of his martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Aikido derives mainly from the martial art of Daito-ryu Aiki-jujutsu, but Ueshiba began to diverge from it in the late 1920s. Aikido uses the movements of the attacker and redirects the force of the attack rather than opposing it head-on. This requires very little physical strength, instead the attacker's momentum and force are used against them through entering and turning movements. The techniques are completed with various throws and/ or joint locks. Muay Thai Muay Thai is a martial art from Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques. Muay Thai is referred to as the "Art of Eight Limbs" or the "Science Of Eight Limbs" because it makes use of punches, kicks, elbows and knee strikes, thus using eight "points of contact".